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Andrzej Ceglarz (Technical University Munich & Renewables Grid Initiative) gives a talk on “Beating head against the wall or by the back door? On Polish and German Interest Groups in the Processes Shaping EU Climate and Energy Policies”

Dates:
  • Thu 14 Nov 2019 16.00 - 18.00
  Add to Calendar 2019-11-14 16:00 2019-11-14 18:00 Europe/Paris Andrzej Ceglarz (Technical University Munich & Renewables Grid Initiative) gives a talk on “Beating head against the wall or by the back door? On Polish and German Interest Groups in the Processes Shaping EU Climate and Energy Policies”

Political Economy Working Group and the EU Studies Working Group

When comparing positions to the EU climate and energy policies, Germany is seen as a leader (because of its rapid development of renewable energy sources [RES]) and Poland as a laggard, largely due to its reliance on coal in the electricity sector. Yet, this is true only partially, since in both countries there exists opposing sectors, fossil fuels and RES, who participate in the EU decision-making process. By taking an institutional approach, my research aims to explain what determines lobbying strategies of actors from both sectors, and through this, to contribute to the conceptualization of political influence.

To obtain the research aims I am applying the EAR instrument, that combines two acknowledged methods to measure influence: attributed influence method with process-tracing. The EAR instrument is a method to explain to the self-perception of actors (E, for ego-perception), perceptions of other key players (A, for alter-perception) and process-tracing (R, for researcher’s analysis), to come to a sound assessment of influence. For my data collection, I have conducted 64 semi-structured interviews with industrial actors engaged in the EU’s decision-making processes at national and European levels, as well as with institutional actors and experts assessing the openness, transparency and responsiveness of the institutions approached by these industrial actors.

On the one hand my research aims to fill research gaps identified in the literature on interest groups: providing a comparative perspective; conceptualizing influence; and investigating interest groups from the Central and Eastern Europe. On the other hand, and more importantly, it aims to understand the EU decision-making processes in the area of climate change. A proper understanding of this is vital, as in both Germany and Poland emissions of green-house gases in electricity sector have grown in recent years, despite ambitious legally binding emission reduction targets, which both countries committed to. Climate change is the most important challenge that humanity faces, and mitigation measures undertaken in the electricity sector are the key for their success, it is therefore crucial to understand processes and the role of various actors behind setting European climate and energy policies.

Seminar Room 3, Badia Fiesolana DD/MM/YYYY
  Seminar Room 3, Badia Fiesolana

Political Economy Working Group and the EU Studies Working Group

When comparing positions to the EU climate and energy policies, Germany is seen as a leader (because of its rapid development of renewable energy sources [RES]) and Poland as a laggard, largely due to its reliance on coal in the electricity sector. Yet, this is true only partially, since in both countries there exists opposing sectors, fossil fuels and RES, who participate in the EU decision-making process. By taking an institutional approach, my research aims to explain what determines lobbying strategies of actors from both sectors, and through this, to contribute to the conceptualization of political influence.

To obtain the research aims I am applying the EAR instrument, that combines two acknowledged methods to measure influence: attributed influence method with process-tracing. The EAR instrument is a method to explain to the self-perception of actors (E, for ego-perception), perceptions of other key players (A, for alter-perception) and process-tracing (R, for researcher’s analysis), to come to a sound assessment of influence. For my data collection, I have conducted 64 semi-structured interviews with industrial actors engaged in the EU’s decision-making processes at national and European levels, as well as with institutional actors and experts assessing the openness, transparency and responsiveness of the institutions approached by these industrial actors.

On the one hand my research aims to fill research gaps identified in the literature on interest groups: providing a comparative perspective; conceptualizing influence; and investigating interest groups from the Central and Eastern Europe. On the other hand, and more importantly, it aims to understand the EU decision-making processes in the area of climate change. A proper understanding of this is vital, as in both Germany and Poland emissions of green-house gases in electricity sector have grown in recent years, despite ambitious legally binding emission reduction targets, which both countries committed to. Climate change is the most important challenge that humanity faces, and mitigation measures undertaken in the electricity sector are the key for their success, it is therefore crucial to understand processes and the role of various actors behind setting European climate and energy policies.


Location:
Seminar Room 3, Badia Fiesolana

Affiliation:
Department of Political and Social Sciences

Type:
Working group

Organiser:
Prof. Dorothee Bohle (EUI - Department of Political and Social Sciences)
Jasper Paul Simons (EUI - Department of Political and Social Sciences)
Timo Seidl (EUI - Department of Political and Social Sciences)

Contact:
Jennifer Rose Dari (EUI - Department of Political and Social Sciences) - Send a mail

Discussant:
Andrzej Ceglarz (Technical University Munich & Renewables Grid Initiative)
 
 

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