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Democratising Migration Governance. Temporary Labour Migration and the Responsibility to Represent

Dates:
  • Mon 20 Jan 2020 11.00 - 13.30
  Add to Calendar 2020-01-20 11:00 2020-01-20 13:30 Europe/Paris Democratising Migration Governance. Temporary Labour Migration and the Responsibility to Represent

This thesis explores the possibility of democratic citizenship of temporary migrants. The main problem I investigate is the persistent, large-scale, and systemic vulnerability of temporary migrants to domination. I argue that they are vulnerable to domination primarily because their political membership and the responsibilities of states towards them are divided between their country of residence and origin. While their lives are conditioned by both countries, they are democratically isolated from both. Are they merely partial citizens detached from any democratic politics? If not, what responsibility should the two countries bear towards temporary migrants within and beyond their jurisdictions? Should our commitments to democracy lead us to endorse a radical conception of migrant citizenship, through which migrants represent their interests and perspectives in-between their country of residence and origin? This thesis addresses these normative issues surrounding temporary labour migration. It develops a democratic theory applicable to this phenomenon, explores the moral and political basis of migrants’ freedom, and explains how to change the current arrangements to produce a more democratically just outcome. Its main contribution lies in establishing a new account of democratic citizenship and responsibility that coherently accommodates the political agencies of temporary migrants. In particular, this thesis introduces a new normative concept and political agenda – the Responsibility to Represent (R2R). Under a system of R2R, both sending and receiving countries bear a shared obligation to stage migrants’ contestatory voices in their public policy-making process for creating a society where everyone can be free from domination. In summary, I argue that temporary migration programmes are just and legitimate, if and only if both sending and receiving states (1) recognise temporary migrants as bearers of a distinct life plan deserving the treatment as equals and non-domination, (2) provide them with necessary protections and sufficient resources for carrying out their plans while accommodating their possible changes, and (3) institutionalise the contestatory channels for them to (de)legitimise the current responsibility structure in-between two states. 

Seminar Room 4 DD/MM/YYYY
  Seminar Room 4

This thesis explores the possibility of democratic citizenship of temporary migrants. The main problem I investigate is the persistent, large-scale, and systemic vulnerability of temporary migrants to domination. I argue that they are vulnerable to domination primarily because their political membership and the responsibilities of states towards them are divided between their country of residence and origin. While their lives are conditioned by both countries, they are democratically isolated from both. Are they merely partial citizens detached from any democratic politics? If not, what responsibility should the two countries bear towards temporary migrants within and beyond their jurisdictions? Should our commitments to democracy lead us to endorse a radical conception of migrant citizenship, through which migrants represent their interests and perspectives in-between their country of residence and origin? This thesis addresses these normative issues surrounding temporary labour migration. It develops a democratic theory applicable to this phenomenon, explores the moral and political basis of migrants’ freedom, and explains how to change the current arrangements to produce a more democratically just outcome. Its main contribution lies in establishing a new account of democratic citizenship and responsibility that coherently accommodates the political agencies of temporary migrants. In particular, this thesis introduces a new normative concept and political agenda – the Responsibility to Represent (R2R). Under a system of R2R, both sending and receiving countries bear a shared obligation to stage migrants’ contestatory voices in their public policy-making process for creating a society where everyone can be free from domination. In summary, I argue that temporary migration programmes are just and legitimate, if and only if both sending and receiving states (1) recognise temporary migrants as bearers of a distinct life plan deserving the treatment as equals and non-domination, (2) provide them with necessary protections and sufficient resources for carrying out their plans while accommodating their possible changes, and (3) institutionalise the contestatory channels for them to (de)legitimise the current responsibility structure in-between two states. 


Location:
Seminar Room 4

Affiliation:
Department of Political and Social Sciences

Type:
Thesis defence

Contact:
Monika Rzemieniecka (EUI - Department of Political and Social Sciences) - Send a mail

Defendant:
Takeshi Miyai (EUI - Department of Political and Social Sciences)

Examiner:
Prof. Richard Bellamy (EUI - Max Weber Programme)
Prof. Valeria Ottonelli (Università di Genova)
Prof. Iseult Honohan (University College Dublin)

Supervisor:
Prof. Rainer Bauböck (RSCAS - Global Governance Programme)
 
 

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