« Back to all events

Democratic hypocrisy: are democratic institutional preferences conditioned on who holds power? (Political Behaviour Colloquium)

Dates:
  • Tue 09 Jun 2020 17.15 - 18.30
  Add to Calendar 2020-06-09 17:15 2020-06-09 18:30 Europe/Paris Democratic hypocrisy: are democratic institutional preferences conditioned on who holds power? (Political Behaviour Colloquium)

With 13 years of democratic backsliding in the world and the polarization driven institutional erosion in the US, people's support for democratic erosion is receiving much overdue attention. But existing studies have a difficulty disentangling contextual effects (such as who is in power) from individual differences (like which party one supports and how much). We propose a novel survey experimental design that hopes to strip the political context through hypothetical scenarios. This allows us to gauge the public’s ?democratic hypocrisy: ?how much the approval of cementing one’s power through institutional manipulation depends on how much one likes who is in power. Findings suggest that while Republicans are more approving of policies that erode democratic institutions, even independent of the political context, both Democrats and Republicans both engage ?democratic hypocrisy,the magnitude of which does depend on partisan attachment and feeling of partisan out-group threat. The findings are clearly alarming. Those committed to democratic principles need to find avenues to reach across the aisle to reverse the course of political distrust and polarization as it appears to be eroding our democratic institutions. 

Online seminar in zoom - DD/MM/YYYY
  Online seminar in zoom -

With 13 years of democratic backsliding in the world and the polarization driven institutional erosion in the US, people's support for democratic erosion is receiving much overdue attention. But existing studies have a difficulty disentangling contextual effects (such as who is in power) from individual differences (like which party one supports and how much). We propose a novel survey experimental design that hopes to strip the political context through hypothetical scenarios. This allows us to gauge the public’s ?democratic hypocrisy: ?how much the approval of cementing one’s power through institutional manipulation depends on how much one likes who is in power. Findings suggest that while Republicans are more approving of policies that erode democratic institutions, even independent of the political context, both Democrats and Republicans both engage ?democratic hypocrisy,the magnitude of which does depend on partisan attachment and feeling of partisan out-group threat. The findings are clearly alarming. Those committed to democratic principles need to find avenues to reach across the aisle to reverse the course of political distrust and polarization as it appears to be eroding our democratic institutions. 


Location:
Online seminar in zoom -

Affiliation:
Department of Political and Social Sciences

Type:
Working group

Contact:
Political Behaviour Colloquium - Send a mail

Organiser:
SPS Researcher Emma Hoes (EUI)
Francesco Colombo

Speaker:
Prof. Levente Littvay (Central European University)

Similar events

 

Page last updated on 18 August 2017