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Angry white women? How the radical right talks about gender and why it matters (Political Behaviour Colloquium)

Dates:
  • Mon 01 Jun 2020 17.15 - 18.15
  Add to Calendar 2020-06-01 17:15 2020-06-01 18:15 Europe/Paris Angry white women? How the radical right talks about gender and why it matters (Political Behaviour Colloquium)

As populist radical right-wing parties (PRRPs) have gained electoral and political leverage across Europe, it is still contested what explains their electoral successes and increasing acceptability. Parties might try to en- gage in a variety of strategies to make themselves feel and appear more mainstream without actually changing their policy positions. By framing their most controversial, unacceptable policy positions in more normatively acceptable ways, PRRPs might try to present themselves as a respectable political option, especially for voters traditionally underrepresented in these parties. In this paper, I examine the effects of one particular frame used by the radical right: using women’s rights and women’s protection to justify anti-immigration claims. I argue that these gendered immigration frames make anti-immigration policies and parties more salient and acceptable to female voters in particular. I will be testing these ideas in a survey experiment on a representative sample in both Germany and Norway. 

Online via zoom - DD/MM/YYYY
  Online via zoom -

As populist radical right-wing parties (PRRPs) have gained electoral and political leverage across Europe, it is still contested what explains their electoral successes and increasing acceptability. Parties might try to en- gage in a variety of strategies to make themselves feel and appear more mainstream without actually changing their policy positions. By framing their most controversial, unacceptable policy positions in more normatively acceptable ways, PRRPs might try to present themselves as a respectable political option, especially for voters traditionally underrepresented in these parties. In this paper, I examine the effects of one particular frame used by the radical right: using women’s rights and women’s protection to justify anti-immigration claims. I argue that these gendered immigration frames make anti-immigration policies and parties more salient and acceptable to female voters in particular. I will be testing these ideas in a survey experiment on a representative sample in both Germany and Norway. 


Location:
Online via zoom -

Affiliation:
Department of Political and Social Sciences

Type:
Working group

Contact:
Political Behaviour Colloquium - Send a mail

Organiser:
SPS Researcher Emma Hoes (EUI)
Francesco Colombo

Speaker:
Prof. Katharina Lawall

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