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Why read The Transformation of Europe today? On Transformation’s constitutional imaginary

Dates:
  • Mon 01 Jun 2020 15.00 - 17.00
  Add to Calendar 2020-06-01 15:00 2020-06-01 17:00 Europe/Paris Why read The Transformation of Europe today? On Transformation’s constitutional imaginary

Almost everybody in the field of European studies would probably agree that Joseph Weiler’s article ‘The Transformation of Europe’, published first in 1991, has been one of the most influential pieces written on European integration and its law. But should we read the essay today? Is it a true classic, in the sense that despite its age it still speaks to us – today? There are several ways of answering this question, besides a mere interest in the intellectual history of European constitutionalism. The paper focuses on the elements of Transformation’s constitutional imaginary: its links to the American culture of liberal legalism; the faith in law; its peculiar notion of ‘the political’; the use of history typical of lawyers; and finally, its lack of attention to the questions of political economy behind the integration project. The paper argues that we can and should learn from reading Transformation as by uncovering its ideological and utopian elements, we may avoid falling into the same traps when trying to construe a different constitutional imaginary for Europe. This is the aim of this article, as part of a wider project that seeks to identify these imaginaries in the work of key European constitutionalists.

Speaker: Prof. Jan Komárek (University of Copenhagen)

Discussant: Prof. Joseph H. H. Weiler (New York University)

Please note that the event will take place online via Zoom and that it will be recorded throughout (except for Q&A) for the purpose of creating awareness and distributing information on the event. The full video will be made available on the YouTube channel of the European University Institute.

To register for the event and receive the paper, please send an e-mail by 31 May 2020 to [email protected]. Zoom link will be sent after the registration.

Outside EUI premises - DD/MM/YYYY
  Outside EUI premises -

Almost everybody in the field of European studies would probably agree that Joseph Weiler’s article ‘The Transformation of Europe’, published first in 1991, has been one of the most influential pieces written on European integration and its law. But should we read the essay today? Is it a true classic, in the sense that despite its age it still speaks to us – today? There are several ways of answering this question, besides a mere interest in the intellectual history of European constitutionalism. The paper focuses on the elements of Transformation’s constitutional imaginary: its links to the American culture of liberal legalism; the faith in law; its peculiar notion of ‘the political’; the use of history typical of lawyers; and finally, its lack of attention to the questions of political economy behind the integration project. The paper argues that we can and should learn from reading Transformation as by uncovering its ideological and utopian elements, we may avoid falling into the same traps when trying to construe a different constitutional imaginary for Europe. This is the aim of this article, as part of a wider project that seeks to identify these imaginaries in the work of key European constitutionalists.

Speaker: Prof. Jan Komárek (University of Copenhagen)

Discussant: Prof. Joseph H. H. Weiler (New York University)

Please note that the event will take place online via Zoom and that it will be recorded throughout (except for Q&A) for the purpose of creating awareness and distributing information on the event. The full video will be made available on the YouTube channel of the European University Institute.

To register for the event and receive the paper, please send an e-mail by 31 May 2020 to [email protected]. Zoom link will be sent after the registration.


Location:
Outside EUI premises -

Affiliation:
Department of Law

Type:
Working group

Contact:
Andrea Gaiba (EUI) - Send a mail

Organiser:
European Union Law Working Group

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