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Situational Valence of Citizenship. The Functions of Legal Status during the COVID-19 Pandemic

Dates:
  • Thu 19 Nov 2020 12.00 - 13.00
  Add to Calendar 2020-11-19 12:00 2020-11-19 13:00 Europe/Paris Situational Valence of Citizenship. The Functions of Legal Status during the COVID-19 Pandemic

Using the case study of the COVID-19 pandemic, we challenge the current binary approaches to the state-citizen link and maintain that citizenship is not conceived of or practiced as ‘thick’ or ‘thin’, but rather as multi-valent and situational. We develop an account of the ‘situational valence of citizenship’ based on an original typology of the functions that citizenship performs for individuals and states in different contexts. We then empirically test this account on the transformation of citizenship that ensued from a provisional shift in the state’s responsibilities towards holders of different legal statuses during COVID-19. We first look at the extent of the state’s responsibility towards citizens abroad and their (non-citizen settled) family members, by zooming in on who qualified for evacuation and consular assistance. Second, we explore how states constituted the ‘body’ of citizenship to whom they were responsible by managing the right to re-entry trough international travel bans. We do so by analysing who were guaranteed the right to cross the country’s borders. Third, we examine the different strategies that states employed in view of social protection of those inside their borders. We are interested in short-term policy changes that allow us to comparatively study whether states distinguished between citizens and (different types of) non-citizens in this regard. We conclude by discussing how crises such as the COVID-19 pandemic challenge the established narratives about citizenship and mobility and propose avenues for future research on the situational nature of the link between individuals and states. The empirical analysis of restrictions on human movement is based on the original International travel restrictions in response to the COVID-19 outbreak dataset (CMMP-2), which covers 204 countries worldwide. The paper that will be presented is an output of the Citizenship, Migration and Mobility in a Pandemic: A Global Study of COVID-19 Restrictions on Human Movement project, financed by the EUI’s Research Council.

Online - Zoom DD/MM/YYYY
  Online - Zoom

Using the case study of the COVID-19 pandemic, we challenge the current binary approaches to the state-citizen link and maintain that citizenship is not conceived of or practiced as ‘thick’ or ‘thin’, but rather as multi-valent and situational. We develop an account of the ‘situational valence of citizenship’ based on an original typology of the functions that citizenship performs for individuals and states in different contexts. We then empirically test this account on the transformation of citizenship that ensued from a provisional shift in the state’s responsibilities towards holders of different legal statuses during COVID-19. We first look at the extent of the state’s responsibility towards citizens abroad and their (non-citizen settled) family members, by zooming in on who qualified for evacuation and consular assistance. Second, we explore how states constituted the ‘body’ of citizenship to whom they were responsible by managing the right to re-entry trough international travel bans. We do so by analysing who were guaranteed the right to cross the country’s borders. Third, we examine the different strategies that states employed in view of social protection of those inside their borders. We are interested in short-term policy changes that allow us to comparatively study whether states distinguished between citizens and (different types of) non-citizens in this regard. We conclude by discussing how crises such as the COVID-19 pandemic challenge the established narratives about citizenship and mobility and propose avenues for future research on the situational nature of the link between individuals and states. The empirical analysis of restrictions on human movement is based on the original International travel restrictions in response to the COVID-19 outbreak dataset (CMMP-2), which covers 204 countries worldwide. The paper that will be presented is an output of the Citizenship, Migration and Mobility in a Pandemic: A Global Study of COVID-19 Restrictions on Human Movement project, financed by the EUI’s Research Council.


Location:
Online - Zoom

Affiliation:
Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies

Type:
Seminar series

Contact:
Ms. Valentina Bettin (EUI) - Send a mail

Organiser:
Prof. Maarten Vink

Speaker:
Jelena Dzankic (EUI - Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies)
Lorenzo Piccoli (EUI - Department of Political and Social Sciences)

Links:
Global Citizenship Observatory

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