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Global Citizenship Seminar - Dual citizenship matters more for some than for others? Identifying the effect of policy change on immigrant naturalisation

Dates:
  • Thu 17 Sep 2020 12.00 - 13.00
  Add to Calendar 2020-09-17 12:00 2020-09-17 13:00 Europe/Paris Global Citizenship Seminar - Dual citizenship matters more for some than for others? Identifying the effect of policy change on immigrant naturalisation

While there is ample evidence that the possibility to hold dual citizenship is a key predictor of the propensity to naturalise among immigrants, existing research on the causal and heterogenous effects of policy reforms is limited. In this paper we analyse the effect of contrasting policy reforms in two West European migration destinations: a restrictive change in the Netherlands (1997) and a liberalising change in Sweden (2001). We apply a difference-in-differences design and identify the treatment effect of destination country policy reform based on origin country citizenship legislation data around the world. Our analyses employ microlevel administrative register data on migration populations in the years around these reforms. We test to what extent the effect of dual citizenship acceptance is concentrated among immigrants from EU and other highly developed countries. Our findings add quasi-experimental evidence to studies on the relevance of dual citizenship acceptance for immigrant naturalisation and inform public debates about the impact of citizenship law reform.

The seminar is fully booked. If you wish to be included in the waiting list please contact Valentina Bettin.

Sala Europa - Villa Schifanoia DD/MM/YYYY
  Sala Europa - Villa Schifanoia

While there is ample evidence that the possibility to hold dual citizenship is a key predictor of the propensity to naturalise among immigrants, existing research on the causal and heterogenous effects of policy reforms is limited. In this paper we analyse the effect of contrasting policy reforms in two West European migration destinations: a restrictive change in the Netherlands (1997) and a liberalising change in Sweden (2001). We apply a difference-in-differences design and identify the treatment effect of destination country policy reform based on origin country citizenship legislation data around the world. Our analyses employ microlevel administrative register data on migration populations in the years around these reforms. We test to what extent the effect of dual citizenship acceptance is concentrated among immigrants from EU and other highly developed countries. Our findings add quasi-experimental evidence to studies on the relevance of dual citizenship acceptance for immigrant naturalisation and inform public debates about the impact of citizenship law reform.

The seminar is fully booked. If you wish to be included in the waiting list please contact Valentina Bettin.


Location:
Sala Europa - Villa Schifanoia

Affiliation:
Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies

Type:
Seminar series

Contact:
Ms. Valentina Bettin (EUI) - Send a mail

Speaker:
Prof. Maarten Vink

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