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Reversing Viewpoint: Travelling Students as Knowledge Agents in Early Modern Europe

Dates:
  • Wed 21 Oct 2020 17.00 - 19.00
  Add to Calendar 2020-10-21 17:00 2020-10-21 19:00 Europe/Paris Reversing Viewpoint: Travelling Students as Knowledge Agents in Early Modern Europe

Academic migration is a phenomenon that has developed in parallel with European universities since the Middle Ages. This is because the most renowned study centres were concentrated in certain geographical areas, particularly in the southern and western regions, attracting professors and students from the rest of the continent. The knowledge produced in these places was naturally transcultural, since it emerged from the work of an international and multilingual community. To date, however, a comprehensive description of knowledge creation in the early modern period, which includes non-academic, intellectual and literary studies, is lacking in the research addressing the development of European intellectual thought. This is because only fragmentary information can be derived from the official documents currently available in the university archives.

The aim of my paper is to reverse our viewpoint by shifting the attention to the travelling students who have traditionally been considered only passive recipients of knowledge. From the second half of the 15th century an unprecedented availability of paper led students to take notes freely on anything they considered useful or interesting for their education and, more generally, for their future. Beyond their academic content, these multi-text documents reflect students’ life experiences as a whole, providing unique documentary evidence of early modern knowledge creation as a transcultural process. 

N.B.: Be aware that due to the physical distancing made necessary for the COVID-19 safety measures, the rooms have a limited capacity. Please register before 16th October with [email protected]

Sala degli Stemmi - Villa Salviati- Castle DD/MM/YYYY
  Sala degli Stemmi - Villa Salviati- Castle

Academic migration is a phenomenon that has developed in parallel with European universities since the Middle Ages. This is because the most renowned study centres were concentrated in certain geographical areas, particularly in the southern and western regions, attracting professors and students from the rest of the continent. The knowledge produced in these places was naturally transcultural, since it emerged from the work of an international and multilingual community. To date, however, a comprehensive description of knowledge creation in the early modern period, which includes non-academic, intellectual and literary studies, is lacking in the research addressing the development of European intellectual thought. This is because only fragmentary information can be derived from the official documents currently available in the university archives.

The aim of my paper is to reverse our viewpoint by shifting the attention to the travelling students who have traditionally been considered only passive recipients of knowledge. From the second half of the 15th century an unprecedented availability of paper led students to take notes freely on anything they considered useful or interesting for their education and, more generally, for their future. Beyond their academic content, these multi-text documents reflect students’ life experiences as a whole, providing unique documentary evidence of early modern knowledge creation as a transcultural process. 

N.B.: Be aware that due to the physical distancing made necessary for the COVID-19 safety measures, the rooms have a limited capacity. Please register before 16th October with [email protected]


Location:
Sala degli Stemmi - Villa Salviati- Castle

Affiliation:
Department of History and Civilization

Type:
Lecture

Contact:
Francesca Parenti - Send a mail

Organiser:
Giorgio Riello
Federico Romero (EUI - HEC)

Speaker:
Valentina Lepri (Polish Academy of Sciences and Fernand Braudel Fellow)

Attachment:
2019 March - Privacy Statement for HEC Events.pdf

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Page last updated on 18 August 2017