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Law and Technology

Dates:
  • Wed 10 Feb 2021 14.00 - 16.00
  Add to Calendar 2021-02-10 14:00 2021-02-10 16:00 Europe/Paris Law and Technology

Discussions over law and technology are all the rage as a new wave of digital innovations like artificial intelligence ( AI ), block chain, augmented reality and robotics are developed and deployed in society. Scientists’ and investors’ fears that overly rigid laws might stifle innovation have fuelled proposals to create regimes of selective immunity for research on certain types of robotic applications. At the same time, ethical concerns have prompted calls for an all-out ban on research in relation to automated weapons of facial recognition. Some scholars even claim that some technological applications like robots will become so important to mankind that a new branch of the law is needed, to grant their race and its individual members the benefits of legal protection , much like society did with the environment.  

With this background, the overall ambition of this course is to map the relations between law and technology. To that end, the course focuses and three perspectives, namely technology and markets, technology and power, and technology and nature. Under each perspective, the course studies the legal questions raised by the introduction of technology in society. In turn, one ambition of the course is to study if and under what conditions legal arrangements are required to establish both ‘genetic’ (eg, algorithms) and ‘environmental’ (eg, human in the loop) constraints on technology in order to ensure present and future wellbeing. In that sense, the course’s ambition strays from scholarly approaches that criticize technology as a substitute to legal authority, or others that uncritically welcome the replacement of legal institutions and norms by technology.

Much of the course will focus on digital technologies, with comparative reference to fields like mechanical, material and chemical technology. Legal history will also be looked at to discuss innovations like the printing press, radio broadcasting and automation. The course will also explore specific fields of law, like constitutional and administrative law, free speech, liability law, intellectual property, competition law, and the law of warfare. There are no prerequisites to take the course.

Sala del Consiglio - Villa Salviati- Castle DD/MM/YYYY
  Sala del Consiglio - Villa Salviati- Castle

Discussions over law and technology are all the rage as a new wave of digital innovations like artificial intelligence ( AI ), block chain, augmented reality and robotics are developed and deployed in society. Scientists’ and investors’ fears that overly rigid laws might stifle innovation have fuelled proposals to create regimes of selective immunity for research on certain types of robotic applications. At the same time, ethical concerns have prompted calls for an all-out ban on research in relation to automated weapons of facial recognition. Some scholars even claim that some technological applications like robots will become so important to mankind that a new branch of the law is needed, to grant their race and its individual members the benefits of legal protection , much like society did with the environment.  

With this background, the overall ambition of this course is to map the relations between law and technology. To that end, the course focuses and three perspectives, namely technology and markets, technology and power, and technology and nature. Under each perspective, the course studies the legal questions raised by the introduction of technology in society. In turn, one ambition of the course is to study if and under what conditions legal arrangements are required to establish both ‘genetic’ (eg, algorithms) and ‘environmental’ (eg, human in the loop) constraints on technology in order to ensure present and future wellbeing. In that sense, the course’s ambition strays from scholarly approaches that criticize technology as a substitute to legal authority, or others that uncritically welcome the replacement of legal institutions and norms by technology.

Much of the course will focus on digital technologies, with comparative reference to fields like mechanical, material and chemical technology. Legal history will also be looked at to discuss innovations like the printing press, radio broadcasting and automation. The course will also explore specific fields of law, like constitutional and administrative law, free speech, liability law, intellectual property, competition law, and the law of warfare. There are no prerequisites to take the course.


Location:
Sala del Consiglio - Villa Salviati- Castle

Affiliation:
Department of Law

Type:
Seminar

Speaker:
Prof Nicolas Petit (EUI - Department of Law & Schuman Centre)

Contact:
Valeria Raso - Send a mail

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