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Workplace Power and Parental Wage Effects

Dates:
  • Thu 22 Oct 2020 13.30 - 15.00
  Add to Calendar 2020-10-22 13:30 2020-10-22 15:00 Europe/Paris Workplace Power and Parental Wage Effects

A presentation within the Inequality Working Group - Distant CLIC

 

The wage effects of parenthood are widely studied, but still not fully understood. The greater wages associated with fatherhood that cannot be accounted for by individual characteristics when analyzing microdata are attributed to employer discrimination and the reinforcement of organizational power hierarchies. We focus on within-firm dynamics to argue how net parental wage effects differ with local power relations. Specifically, we contend that high-skilled fathers can exploit their advantage in lower-skilled firms to increase the fatherhood wage premium. Less-skilled fathers can hoard collective advantage in firms with a larger share of parents to the same net wage effects. We test our hypotheses using 1995 to 2015 waves of high-quality Finnish linked employee-employer panel data that allow us to compare fathers’ net wages vis-à-vis childless men in the same occupation and firm (job cell). Results confirm the importance of individual agency and collective action in structuring fatherhood wage effects.  

online - via Zoom DD/MM/YYYY
  online - via Zoom

A presentation within the Inequality Working Group - Distant CLIC

 

The wage effects of parenthood are widely studied, but still not fully understood. The greater wages associated with fatherhood that cannot be accounted for by individual characteristics when analyzing microdata are attributed to employer discrimination and the reinforcement of organizational power hierarchies. We focus on within-firm dynamics to argue how net parental wage effects differ with local power relations. Specifically, we contend that high-skilled fathers can exploit their advantage in lower-skilled firms to increase the fatherhood wage premium. Less-skilled fathers can hoard collective advantage in firms with a larger share of parents to the same net wage effects. We test our hypotheses using 1995 to 2015 waves of high-quality Finnish linked employee-employer panel data that allow us to compare fathers’ net wages vis-à-vis childless men in the same occupation and firm (job cell). Results confirm the importance of individual agency and collective action in structuring fatherhood wage effects.  


Location:
online - via Zoom

Affiliation:
Department of Political and Social Sciences

Type:
Working group

Contact:
Monika Rzemieniecka (EUI - Department of Political and Social Sciences) - Send a mail

Organiser:
Prof. Fabrizio Bernardi
Prof. Juho Härkönen

Speaker:
Prof. Lynn Prince Cooke (University of Bath)
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