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The Enduring Impact of NYC's Stop, Question & Frisk Program. Lessons from 'Big Data'

Dates:
  • Thu 03 Dec 2020 16.00 - 17.30
  Add to Calendar 2020-12-03 16:00 2020-12-03 17:30 Europe/Paris The Enduring Impact of NYC's Stop, Question & Frisk Program. Lessons from 'Big Data'

A presentation within the Inequality Working Group - Distant CLIC

Seven years after the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York ruled that Stop, Question, and Frisk (SQF) is unconstitutional, researchers continue to explore the enduring impact of the policy. Using large-scale administrative data from New York City, I present results from several projects with four key conclusions. First, disparities in exposure to stop-and-frisk are vast. Second, racial bias in policing mostly likely explains some of these disparities in exposure. Third, there is some evidence that SQF and related policies reduced crime. Finally, my research shows the social costs of Stop, Question & Frisk for the education and health of minority youth. These findings provide evidence that the consequences of policing extend into key domains of social life, with implications for the educational trajectories of minority youth and social inequality more broadly.

online - via Zoom DD/MM/YYYY
  online - via Zoom

A presentation within the Inequality Working Group - Distant CLIC

Seven years after the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York ruled that Stop, Question, and Frisk (SQF) is unconstitutional, researchers continue to explore the enduring impact of the policy. Using large-scale administrative data from New York City, I present results from several projects with four key conclusions. First, disparities in exposure to stop-and-frisk are vast. Second, racial bias in policing mostly likely explains some of these disparities in exposure. Third, there is some evidence that SQF and related policies reduced crime. Finally, my research shows the social costs of Stop, Question & Frisk for the education and health of minority youth. These findings provide evidence that the consequences of policing extend into key domains of social life, with implications for the educational trajectories of minority youth and social inequality more broadly.


Location:
online - via Zoom

Affiliation:
Department of Political and Social Sciences

Type:
Working group

Contact:
Monika Rzemieniecka (EUI - Department of Political and Social Sciences) - Send a mail
CLIC Inequality Working Group - Send a mail

Organiser:
Prof. Fabrizio Bernardi
Prof. Juho Härkönen

Speaker:
Prof. Joscha Legewie (Harvard University)

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