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Redistributive Wars

Dates:
  • Mon 19 Oct 2020 13.00 - 15.00
  Add to Calendar 2020-10-19 13:00 2020-10-19 15:00 Europe/Paris Redistributive Wars

Can the global poor wage a just redistributive war against the global rich? The moral norms governing the use of force are usually – and for good reasons – considered to be very strict. It seems to be a far stretch from the justification of self-defence to the justification of redistributive wars. Yet, a small group of philosophers recently tried to defend precisely that. They defend the controversial claim that, under certain circumstances and as an ultimum remedium, the global poor can be justified in waging a redistributive war against the global rich. Dr. Lonneke Peperkamp discusses redistributive wars and aims to determine whether redistribution (more precisely: violated global justice duties) can be a just cause for war. Dr. Peperkamp focuses on the ‘doing harm argument for redistributive wars’, under the assumption that the alternative ‘allowing harm argument for redistributive wars’ is a more difficult route to justify redistributive wars. An assessment shows that a general ‘doing harm argument’ for redistributive wars is unconvincing, while a reinterpretation of that argument might give rise to a just cause for war.

 

Dr. Lonneke Peperkamp is assistant professor in Philosophy of Law at Radboud University Nijmegen, and research fellow at University College Dublin and Goethe University Frankfurt. She currently works on a two-year research project 'Claiming Subsistence Rights', funded by a Government of Ireland Postdoctoral Fellowship. Her research interests are just war theory, peace building, space security, global justice, poverty, and human rights. She is a member of the board of directors of EuroISME (the International Society for Military Ethics in Europe). 

 

 

All interested fellows, researchers, professors and visiting academics are invited to participate. To register for the event, please send an e-mail by 15 October 2020, 12:00 CET to [email protected], indicating whether you wish to participate in person or via ZoomThe paper and Zoom link will be shared with registered participants prior to the event.

 

The Legal and Political Theory Working Group aims to provide both established academics and PhD researchers an opportunity to discuss and improve their theoretically-oriented work within a friendly yet academically rigorous setting. The group is grateful for the support of Prof. Jeffrey Checkel and Prof. Martijn Hesselink. If you would like to find out more, please contact us at [email protected].

 

The Human and Fundamental Rights Working Group provides a forum for researchers to discuss issues related to the protection of human rights at domestic, regional and international levels. The group is grateful for the support of Prof. Sarah Nouwen. For more information about the Human and Fundamental Rights Working Group, please this link, or contact [email protected]

Sala degli Stemmi - Villa Salviati- Castle DD/MM/YYYY
  Sala degli Stemmi - Villa Salviati- Castle

Can the global poor wage a just redistributive war against the global rich? The moral norms governing the use of force are usually – and for good reasons – considered to be very strict. It seems to be a far stretch from the justification of self-defence to the justification of redistributive wars. Yet, a small group of philosophers recently tried to defend precisely that. They defend the controversial claim that, under certain circumstances and as an ultimum remedium, the global poor can be justified in waging a redistributive war against the global rich. Dr. Lonneke Peperkamp discusses redistributive wars and aims to determine whether redistribution (more precisely: violated global justice duties) can be a just cause for war. Dr. Peperkamp focuses on the ‘doing harm argument for redistributive wars’, under the assumption that the alternative ‘allowing harm argument for redistributive wars’ is a more difficult route to justify redistributive wars. An assessment shows that a general ‘doing harm argument’ for redistributive wars is unconvincing, while a reinterpretation of that argument might give rise to a just cause for war.

 

Dr. Lonneke Peperkamp is assistant professor in Philosophy of Law at Radboud University Nijmegen, and research fellow at University College Dublin and Goethe University Frankfurt. She currently works on a two-year research project 'Claiming Subsistence Rights', funded by a Government of Ireland Postdoctoral Fellowship. Her research interests are just war theory, peace building, space security, global justice, poverty, and human rights. She is a member of the board of directors of EuroISME (the International Society for Military Ethics in Europe). 

 

 

All interested fellows, researchers, professors and visiting academics are invited to participate. To register for the event, please send an e-mail by 15 October 2020, 12:00 CET to [email protected], indicating whether you wish to participate in person or via ZoomThe paper and Zoom link will be shared with registered participants prior to the event.

 

The Legal and Political Theory Working Group aims to provide both established academics and PhD researchers an opportunity to discuss and improve their theoretically-oriented work within a friendly yet academically rigorous setting. The group is grateful for the support of Prof. Jeffrey Checkel and Prof. Martijn Hesselink. If you would like to find out more, please contact us at [email protected].

 

The Human and Fundamental Rights Working Group provides a forum for researchers to discuss issues related to the protection of human rights at domestic, regional and international levels. The group is grateful for the support of Prof. Sarah Nouwen. For more information about the Human and Fundamental Rights Working Group, please this link, or contact [email protected]


Location:
Sala degli Stemmi - Villa Salviati- Castle

Affiliation:
Department of Law

Type:
Working group

Contact:
Valeria Raso - Send a mail

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