« Back to all events

Beyond Order and Disorder. Crowd Behaviour in Kristiania in the 1890s

Dates:
  • Thu 10 Dec 2020 15.00 - 17.00
  Add to Calendar 2020-12-10 15:00 2020-12-10 17:00 Europe/Paris Beyond Order and Disorder. Crowd Behaviour in Kristiania in the 1890s

This dissertation is a local history of crowd formation and crowd action in the city of Kristiania (today Oslo) in the 1890s. This was a decade of turbulent labour relations and one in which we can locate the beginnings of a lasting organised labour movement. As the title indicates, the main analytical goal is to overcome a dichotomous view of crowd behaviour at the end of the nineteenth century—a view that categorises crowds as expressions of ‘order’ or ‘disorder’. The dissertation disaggregates the idea of ‘the crowd’ that was imposed on these actions in the 1890s by observers and participants from both the political right and left, observers who sought both to make sense of and to use crowd actions for their own purposes. This dissertation teases out common traits of crowd actions, the causes of these actions, and how they were framed through post hoc categorisation. All the while, drawing on local context for sensible answers.

via ZOOM - via ZOOM DD/MM/YYYY
  via ZOOM - via ZOOM

This dissertation is a local history of crowd formation and crowd action in the city of Kristiania (today Oslo) in the 1890s. This was a decade of turbulent labour relations and one in which we can locate the beginnings of a lasting organised labour movement. As the title indicates, the main analytical goal is to overcome a dichotomous view of crowd behaviour at the end of the nineteenth century—a view that categorises crowds as expressions of ‘order’ or ‘disorder’. The dissertation disaggregates the idea of ‘the crowd’ that was imposed on these actions in the 1890s by observers and participants from both the political right and left, observers who sought both to make sense of and to use crowd actions for their own purposes. This dissertation teases out common traits of crowd actions, the causes of these actions, and how they were framed through post hoc categorisation. All the while, drawing on local context for sensible answers.


Location:
via ZOOM - via ZOOM

Affiliation:
Department of History and Civilization

Type:
Thesis defence

Contact:
Francesca Parenti - Send a mail

Defendant:
Tiago Matos (EUI - Department of History and Civilization)

Examiner:
Prof. Laura Lee Downs
Prof Kevin Passmore (Cardiff University)
Knut Kjeldstadli (University of Oslo)

Supervisor:
Pieter Judson

Similar events

 

Page last updated on 18 August 2017