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The Patrimonial State in Historic Perspective - Europe in the World

Dates:
  • Thu 14 Jan 2021 15.00 - 16.00
  Add to Calendar 2021-01-14 15:00 2021-01-14 16:00 Europe/Paris The Patrimonial State in Historic Perspective - Europe in the World

The ‘patrimonial state’ (one in which the ruler claims the realm as their personal property) looms large in the conventional understanding of pre-modern antecedents to the modern state in Europe. It is often thought that before an impersonal territorial state emerged in the seventeenth century, the right to rule was driven by a private claim of dynasties to own their realms as a kind of property. Patrimonial rulership-as-ownership is still widely used today as a model for ‘backward’ political societies. In this presentation, Benjamin Mueser argues that any such state likely never existed in its ideal form. But patrimonial kingship was nonetheless theoretically important for the development and defence of modern states. Drawing on close textual analysis of works in early international law, Mueser posits that authors who rejected the patrimonial idea that rulers could rightfully divide, partition, and alienate their territories, laid the foundation for an impersonal and inviolable territorial community, which underlies the modern state.

Chair: Klodiana Beshku | Robert Schuman Centre, EUI

Deadline for registrations: 13 January @ 5pm CET

Zoom link will be sent upon registration.

Online - Zoom DD/MM/YYYY
  Online - Zoom

The ‘patrimonial state’ (one in which the ruler claims the realm as their personal property) looms large in the conventional understanding of pre-modern antecedents to the modern state in Europe. It is often thought that before an impersonal territorial state emerged in the seventeenth century, the right to rule was driven by a private claim of dynasties to own their realms as a kind of property. Patrimonial rulership-as-ownership is still widely used today as a model for ‘backward’ political societies. In this presentation, Benjamin Mueser argues that any such state likely never existed in its ideal form. But patrimonial kingship was nonetheless theoretically important for the development and defence of modern states. Drawing on close textual analysis of works in early international law, Mueser posits that authors who rejected the patrimonial idea that rulers could rightfully divide, partition, and alienate their territories, laid the foundation for an impersonal and inviolable territorial community, which underlies the modern state.

Chair: Klodiana Beshku | Robert Schuman Centre, EUI

Deadline for registrations: 13 January @ 5pm CET

Zoom link will be sent upon registration.


Location:
Online - Zoom

Affiliation:
Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies

Type:
Research seminar

Contact:
Mia Saugman - Send a mail

Organiser:
Ulrich Krotz (EUI - RSCAS)

Speaker:
Benjamin Mueser (Max Weber Fellow, EUI)

Links:
Global Governance Programme
Register here

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Page last updated on 18 August 2017