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Waste in postwar twentieth century

Dates:
  • Wed 24 Feb 2021 17.00 - 18.30
  Add to Calendar 2021-02-24 17:00 2021-02-24 18:30 Europe/Paris Waste in postwar twentieth century

In the framework of the HEC Department Colloquium lecture series

Waste is a large and fuzzy concept: large because it encompasses anything ranging from human excreta to nuclear waste, and fuzzy because it is based on perceived usefulness, which may change quickly as perceptions, technical processes, living standards or social preferences change. In line with rising incomes and living standards, the generation of waste, defined as unwanted material, increased dramatically during the twentieth century, spreading leftovers of a wasteful life-style to even remote corners of the world.

Since 1945, many international organizations, such as the UN, WHO and the OECD, have included various forms of waste into their work program. On the basis of published and archival sources, this talk seeks to provide a survey over topics which organizations have addressed, the perspectives they have taken and how they have evolved over time. Findings suggest that while the related studies were often very technical, they repeatedly touched on questions of principle of what constituted waste and how it related to its developmental context. Ultimately, all have been caught in - and arguably lent legitimacy to - the dynamics of a global development whose growing industrialization and consumption entailed an increasing production of eventually unwanted products and substances.  

 

The lecture will be held on ZOOM. Please contact Francesca Parenti ([email protected])

Via ZOOM - DD/MM/YYYY
  Via ZOOM -

In the framework of the HEC Department Colloquium lecture series

Waste is a large and fuzzy concept: large because it encompasses anything ranging from human excreta to nuclear waste, and fuzzy because it is based on perceived usefulness, which may change quickly as perceptions, technical processes, living standards or social preferences change. In line with rising incomes and living standards, the generation of waste, defined as unwanted material, increased dramatically during the twentieth century, spreading leftovers of a wasteful life-style to even remote corners of the world.

Since 1945, many international organizations, such as the UN, WHO and the OECD, have included various forms of waste into their work program. On the basis of published and archival sources, this talk seeks to provide a survey over topics which organizations have addressed, the perspectives they have taken and how they have evolved over time. Findings suggest that while the related studies were often very technical, they repeatedly touched on questions of principle of what constituted waste and how it related to its developmental context. Ultimately, all have been caught in - and arguably lent legitimacy to - the dynamics of a global development whose growing industrialization and consumption entailed an increasing production of eventually unwanted products and substances.  

 

The lecture will be held on ZOOM. Please contact Francesca Parenti ([email protected])


Location:
Via ZOOM -

Affiliation:
Department of History and Civilization

Type:
Lecture

Contact:
Francesca Parenti - Send a mail

Organiser:
Federico Romero (EUI - HEC)
Giorgio Riello (EUI - HEC)

Speaker:
Iris Borowy (Shanghai University and Fernand Braudel Fellow)

Attachment:
2019 March - Privacy Statement for HEC Events.pdf
 

Page last updated on 18 August 2017