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Intellectual History Working group - Digital Humanities Session 1

Dates:
  • Thu 26 Nov 2020 15.00 - 17.00
  Add to Calendar 2020-11-26 15:00 2020-11-26 17:00 Europe/Paris Intellectual History Working group - Digital Humanities Session 1

The Intellectual History Working Group is launching a new series of sessions about digital tools and digital humanities. Our first session will be led by Dr Alexandra Ortolja-Baird (King’s College London).

We live in a digital age: Wikipedia, TikTok, Google Maps, and many other digital technologies and platforms shape our lives and alter how we think about our futures. But how does our digital world affect how we think about the past? How do digital technologies impact upon the study of History? Are data and digitisation opening up new worlds for the historian, or engraining ahistorical tropes and biases? Is Twitter a legitimate historical source? What do algorithms have to do with History? Does it matter who funds Google Books? These questions, and many more, are at the heart of discussions concerning the relationship between History and the Digital Humanities.

 

In recent years Intellectual History has increasingly faced these questions head-on, engaging with the technologies, methods, and ethics of the Digital Humanities. In this session we will reflect on the ways in which different types of digital tools can facilitate intellectual historical research, present new questions, and communicate research findings to both scholars and the public. We will also consider the disadvantages and potential dangers of such approaches. In the second half of the session we will reassess our reflections by testing some of the digital tools available to intellectual historians.

 

Please note: Because this online workshop has a practical component, please contact the organisers in advance regarding accessibility concerns so that adjustments can be made.

 

Recommended Reading (any of the following will be useful for our discussion)

  1. Dan Edelstein et al. (2017). Historical Research in a Digital Age: Reflections from the Mapping the Republic of Letters Project . https://doi.org/10.1093/ahr/122.2.400
  2. Peter de Bolla et al. (2020). The Idea of Liberty, 1600–1800: A Distributional Concept Analysis. Journal of the History of Ideas, vol. 81 no. 3, p. 381-406. Project MUSE, doi:10.1353/jhi.2020.0023.

-          (You might also want to read Edelstein’s review of Bolla’s earlier work here: Dan Edelstein, (2016) Intellectual History and Digital Humanities,  Modern Intellectual History, Cambridge University Press, 13(1), pp. 237–246.)

  1. Mark J. Hill (2016) Invisible interpretations: reflections on the digital humanities and intellectual history, Global Intellectual History, 1:2, 130- 150, DOI: 10.1080/23801883.2017.1304162

-         (for a similar overview for History more generally, you might also like: C. A. Romein et al. State of the Field: Digital History (2020). doi:10.1111/1468-229X.12969)

  1. Ingeborg van Vugt, (2017). Using Multi-Layered Networks to Disclose Books in the Republic of Letters . Journal of Historical Network Research, 1(1), 25-51. //jhnr.uni.lu/index.php/jhnr/article/view/7
  2. The following short sections from The Historian’s Macroscope: http://www.themacroscope.org/?page_id=584
  3. The joys of big data
  4. Big Data
  5. Putting Big Data to Good Use: Historical Case Studies
  6. Why We’re All Digital Now

Want to become a digital historian? Then look no further. You can train and tool-up with the following guides:

https://programminghistorian.org/

http://toolingup.stanford.edu/

http://www.themacroscope.org/?page_id=584

http://chnm.gmu.edu/digitalhistory/

For the ZOOM link, please contact Elisavet Papalexopoulou

Via ZOOM - DD/MM/YYYY
  Via ZOOM -

The Intellectual History Working Group is launching a new series of sessions about digital tools and digital humanities. Our first session will be led by Dr Alexandra Ortolja-Baird (King’s College London).

We live in a digital age: Wikipedia, TikTok, Google Maps, and many other digital technologies and platforms shape our lives and alter how we think about our futures. But how does our digital world affect how we think about the past? How do digital technologies impact upon the study of History? Are data and digitisation opening up new worlds for the historian, or engraining ahistorical tropes and biases? Is Twitter a legitimate historical source? What do algorithms have to do with History? Does it matter who funds Google Books? These questions, and many more, are at the heart of discussions concerning the relationship between History and the Digital Humanities.

 

In recent years Intellectual History has increasingly faced these questions head-on, engaging with the technologies, methods, and ethics of the Digital Humanities. In this session we will reflect on the ways in which different types of digital tools can facilitate intellectual historical research, present new questions, and communicate research findings to both scholars and the public. We will also consider the disadvantages and potential dangers of such approaches. In the second half of the session we will reassess our reflections by testing some of the digital tools available to intellectual historians.

 

Please note: Because this online workshop has a practical component, please contact the organisers in advance regarding accessibility concerns so that adjustments can be made.

 

Recommended Reading (any of the following will be useful for our discussion)

  1. Dan Edelstein et al. (2017). Historical Research in a Digital Age: Reflections from the Mapping the Republic of Letters Project . https://doi.org/10.1093/ahr/122.2.400
  2. Peter de Bolla et al. (2020). The Idea of Liberty, 1600–1800: A Distributional Concept Analysis. Journal of the History of Ideas, vol. 81 no. 3, p. 381-406. Project MUSE, doi:10.1353/jhi.2020.0023.

-          (You might also want to read Edelstein’s review of Bolla’s earlier work here: Dan Edelstein, (2016) Intellectual History and Digital Humanities,  Modern Intellectual History, Cambridge University Press, 13(1), pp. 237–246.)

  1. Mark J. Hill (2016) Invisible interpretations: reflections on the digital humanities and intellectual history, Global Intellectual History, 1:2, 130- 150, DOI: 10.1080/23801883.2017.1304162

-         (for a similar overview for History more generally, you might also like: C. A. Romein et al. State of the Field: Digital History (2020). doi:10.1111/1468-229X.12969)

  1. Ingeborg van Vugt, (2017). Using Multi-Layered Networks to Disclose Books in the Republic of Letters . Journal of Historical Network Research, 1(1), 25-51. //jhnr.uni.lu/index.php/jhnr/article/view/7
  2. The following short sections from The Historian’s Macroscope: http://www.themacroscope.org/?page_id=584
  3. The joys of big data
  4. Big Data
  5. Putting Big Data to Good Use: Historical Case Studies
  6. Why We’re All Digital Now

Want to become a digital historian? Then look no further. You can train and tool-up with the following guides:

https://programminghistorian.org/

http://toolingup.stanford.edu/

http://www.themacroscope.org/?page_id=584

http://chnm.gmu.edu/digitalhistory/

For the ZOOM link, please contact Elisavet Papalexopoulou


Location:
Via ZOOM -

Affiliation:
Department of History and Civilization

Type:
Working group

Contact:
Elisavet Papalexopoulou (EUI) - Send a mail

Organiser:
Elisavet Papalexopoulou (EUI)

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Page last updated on 18 August 2017