« Back to all events

Qualitative and Fieldwork Working Group

Dates:
  • Fri 05 Feb 2021 13.00 - 15.00
  Add to Calendar 2021-02-05 13:00 2021-02-05 15:00 Europe/Paris Qualitative and Fieldwork Working Group

This session, which will be held online via Zoom, is themed Positionality and will concentrate on the importance of positionality when designing, conducting and evaluating fieldwork research: 

  • How does your gender, subjective identity, race, religion and position as a researcher affect your research?
  • How are power and positionality connected?
  • How to address positionality in your research design, during fieldwork and in data analysis?

 

For this session we are very excited to be joined by Dr. Shannon Philip (The University of Cambridge) who has kindly agreed to share some of his personal experience in answering the above questions. 

 

Shannon Philip is an urban sociologist and ethnographer currently researching gender and urban transformations in post-apartheid South Africa. He is interested in the intersections of race, gender, sexualities, masculinities, class and development in the urban context of Johannesburg. Before coming to Cambridge, Shannon completed his PhD at the University of Oxford where he used a combination of longitudinal ethnographic methods and visual analysis to study urban youth, masculinities, gender, development and the policing of public bodies in neoliberal India. His post-doctoral research on South Africa builds and expands several themes of his doctoral research and looks at India and South Africa comparatively. 

 

Dr. Philip will be joining us for the entire 2-hour session. In the first hour he will give a short presentation outlining his own experience in addressing as well as studying issues related to positionality. The presentation will be also feature a short group activity on positionality. For the purposes of which we ask all participants to read a short extract from Dr. Philip’s field notes (Word file attached).

We will then open the floor for an open debate where you will have the opportunity to ask direct questions with regards positionality in your own research. 

The second hour, following a short break, will be devoted to discussing two papers dealing with the subject of ethics from different perspectives and in relation to Dr. Philip’s presentation: 

  • Ortbals, C. D., & Rincker, M. E. (2009). Fieldwork, Identities, and Intersectionality: Negotiating Gender, Race, Class, Religion, Nationality, and Age in the Research Field Abroad: Editors’ Introduction. PS: Political Science & Politics, 42(02), 287–290.
  • Alcalde, M. Cristina. 2007. A Feminist Anthropologist's Reflections on Dilemmas of Power and Positionality in the Field. Meridians: Feminism, Race, Transnationalism 7 (2): 143–62
  • Additional recommended reading: Haraway, D. (1988). Situated Knowledges: The Science Question in Feminism and the Privilege of Partial Perspective. Feminist Studies, 14(3), 575-599. doi:10.2307/3178066

 

Outside EUI premises - DD/MM/YYYY
  Outside EUI premises -

This session, which will be held online via Zoom, is themed Positionality and will concentrate on the importance of positionality when designing, conducting and evaluating fieldwork research: 

  • How does your gender, subjective identity, race, religion and position as a researcher affect your research?
  • How are power and positionality connected?
  • How to address positionality in your research design, during fieldwork and in data analysis?

 

For this session we are very excited to be joined by Dr. Shannon Philip (The University of Cambridge) who has kindly agreed to share some of his personal experience in answering the above questions. 

 

Shannon Philip is an urban sociologist and ethnographer currently researching gender and urban transformations in post-apartheid South Africa. He is interested in the intersections of race, gender, sexualities, masculinities, class and development in the urban context of Johannesburg. Before coming to Cambridge, Shannon completed his PhD at the University of Oxford where he used a combination of longitudinal ethnographic methods and visual analysis to study urban youth, masculinities, gender, development and the policing of public bodies in neoliberal India. His post-doctoral research on South Africa builds and expands several themes of his doctoral research and looks at India and South Africa comparatively. 

 

Dr. Philip will be joining us for the entire 2-hour session. In the first hour he will give a short presentation outlining his own experience in addressing as well as studying issues related to positionality. The presentation will be also feature a short group activity on positionality. For the purposes of which we ask all participants to read a short extract from Dr. Philip’s field notes (Word file attached).

We will then open the floor for an open debate where you will have the opportunity to ask direct questions with regards positionality in your own research. 

The second hour, following a short break, will be devoted to discussing two papers dealing with the subject of ethics from different perspectives and in relation to Dr. Philip’s presentation: 

  • Ortbals, C. D., & Rincker, M. E. (2009). Fieldwork, Identities, and Intersectionality: Negotiating Gender, Race, Class, Religion, Nationality, and Age in the Research Field Abroad: Editors’ Introduction. PS: Political Science & Politics, 42(02), 287–290.
  • Alcalde, M. Cristina. 2007. A Feminist Anthropologist's Reflections on Dilemmas of Power and Positionality in the Field. Meridians: Feminism, Race, Transnationalism 7 (2): 143–62
  • Additional recommended reading: Haraway, D. (1988). Situated Knowledges: The Science Question in Feminism and the Privilege of Partial Perspective. Feminist Studies, 14(3), 575-599. doi:10.2307/3178066

 


Location:
Outside EUI premises -

Affiliation:
Department of Political and Social Sciences

Type:
Working group

Contact:
Adele Ines Battistini (EUI - Department of Political and Social Sciences) - Send a mail

Organiser:
Wolfgang Minatti (EUI)

Speaker:
Dr Shannon Philip

Similar events

 

Page last updated on 18 August 2017