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Tarocchi as Renaissance Memory Places

Dates:
  • Thu 12 Jul 2012 16.00 - 18.00
  Add to Calendar 2012-07-12 16:00 2012-07-12 18:00 Europe/Paris Tarocchi as Renaissance Memory Places

Why were the Tarocchi cards invented? Historiography gives two disjunctive answers:
gaming and fortunetelling. This thesis offers a third original answer. Tarocchi as
Renaissance Memory Places shows that these figurative playing cards, invented during midquattrocento
at the courts of Milan and Ferrara, were mnemonic systems created for
educational purposes such as the remembrance and reconstruction of the past (reminding of
the family biography and genealogy, the moral values reflected through virtues and
mythology). They were influenced by and influenced the contemporary mnemonic literature,
while opening the European pedagogical cards tradition.

Cappella, Villa Schifanoia - SCHIFANOIA DD/MM/YYYY
  Cappella, Villa Schifanoia - SCHIFANOIA

Why were the Tarocchi cards invented? Historiography gives two disjunctive answers:
gaming and fortunetelling. This thesis offers a third original answer. Tarocchi as
Renaissance Memory Places shows that these figurative playing cards, invented during midquattrocento
at the courts of Milan and Ferrara, were mnemonic systems created for
educational purposes such as the remembrance and reconstruction of the past (reminding of
the family biography and genealogy, the moral values reflected through virtues and
mythology). They were influenced by and influenced the contemporary mnemonic literature,
while opening the European pedagogical cards tradition.


Location:
Cappella, Villa Schifanoia - SCHIFANOIA

Affiliation:
Department of History and Civilization

Type:
Thesis defence

Supervisor:
Martin van Gelderen (EUI - Department of History and Civilization)

Examiner:
Prof. Luca Molà (EUI - Department of History and Civilization)
Prof. Evelyn Welch (Kingʼs College London)
Prof. Gherardo Ortalli (Università Ca’ Foscari di Venezia)

Contact:
Monica Palao Calvo - Send a mail

Defendant:
Patricia Nedelea (EUI - Department of History and Civilization)
 

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