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Borders and Belonging, Migration and the Swedish Nation 1890-1914

Dates:
  • Mon 13 Jan 2014 15.00 - 18.00
  Add to Calendar 2014-01-13 15:00 2014-01-13 18:00 Europe/Paris Borders and Belonging, Migration and the Swedish Nation 1890-1914

This thesis studies the consequences of turn of the twentieth century migration on Swedish national developments. It pays particular attention to the introduction of a reform programme of internal colonisation and the consequences this had on different population groups. Arguing that the ideological origins of this internal colonisation can be found in Germany, the thesis explicitly links German colonisation attempts in the East with the corresponding Swedish colonisation in the North. By doing so it puts forward the argument that spaces in the Swedish North were cast in colonial terms and should be understood in relation to the colonial policies of the European Imperial states.
Migration also led to a new understanding of Swedish identity which drew less on spatial contexts than on the idea of difference. By constructing a complex identification matrix which drew on categories of race, class and gender, Swedish observers could overcome geographical distance and create an imagined Swedish community that stretched around the globe. Dirt and domestic degeneracy were important tropes in this discourse, acting as connecting bridges between the categories. The timing of its introduction and the contents of this discourse of difference can be explained by a Swedish perception of being part of a white man’s culture that was imagined on a global scale. European imperialisms and the resulting colonial trajectories were thus decisive also for Swedish developments. The focus of the thesis follows from the above as it explores the connections between migration, regimes of difference and nationalism in Sweden at the turn of the twentieth century.
Key Words: Sweden, migration, regimes of difference, internal colonisation, civilization, dirt, domestic degeneracy, colonial cultures.

Sala Europa, Villa Schifanoia - SCHIFANOIA DD/MM/YYYY
  Sala Europa, Villa Schifanoia - SCHIFANOIA

This thesis studies the consequences of turn of the twentieth century migration on Swedish national developments. It pays particular attention to the introduction of a reform programme of internal colonisation and the consequences this had on different population groups. Arguing that the ideological origins of this internal colonisation can be found in Germany, the thesis explicitly links German colonisation attempts in the East with the corresponding Swedish colonisation in the North. By doing so it puts forward the argument that spaces in the Swedish North were cast in colonial terms and should be understood in relation to the colonial policies of the European Imperial states.
Migration also led to a new understanding of Swedish identity which drew less on spatial contexts than on the idea of difference. By constructing a complex identification matrix which drew on categories of race, class and gender, Swedish observers could overcome geographical distance and create an imagined Swedish community that stretched around the globe. Dirt and domestic degeneracy were important tropes in this discourse, acting as connecting bridges between the categories. The timing of its introduction and the contents of this discourse of difference can be explained by a Swedish perception of being part of a white man’s culture that was imagined on a global scale. European imperialisms and the resulting colonial trajectories were thus decisive also for Swedish developments. The focus of the thesis follows from the above as it explores the connections between migration, regimes of difference and nationalism in Sweden at the turn of the twentieth century.
Key Words: Sweden, migration, regimes of difference, internal colonisation, civilization, dirt, domestic degeneracy, colonial cultures.


Location:
Sala Europa, Villa Schifanoia - SCHIFANOIA

Affiliation:
Department of History and Civilization

Type:
Thesis defence

Examiner:
Lars Edgren (University of Lund)
Prof. Dirk Moses
Professor Clare Midgley (Sheffield Hallam University)

Contact:
Kathy Wolf Fabiani - Send a mail

Supervisor:
Prof. Sebastian Conrad

Defendant:
Louise Bergström (EUI - Department of History and Civilization)
 

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