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Seminar

EGPP Seminar Series

Presentations: De jure united, de facto divided; Populism and practices of IOs

Add to calendar 2022-03-02 12:30 2022-03-02 14:00 Europe/Rome EGPP Seminar Series Sala Triaria Villa Schifanoia YYYY-MM-DD
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When

02 March 2022

12:30 - 14:00 CEST

Where

Sala Triaria

Villa Schifanoia

Join Anna Savolainen and Raffaele Mastrorocco for their presentations at the next EGPP seminar series co-organised with the EU Studies Working Group

Join Anna Savolainen and Raffaele Mastrorocco for their presentations at the next EGPP seminar series co-organised with the EU Studies Working Group

De jure united, de facto divided? Member state strategies to EU defence integration | Anna Savolainen

Since 1998, the European Union has sought to build up European military capability within the framework of the Common Security and Defence Policy (CSDP). Most member states have chosen to participate in most CSDP initiatives, with only Denmark opting out of the policy altogether. However, in practice member states’ contributions vary significantly. Often, they are very small. The inconsistency between de jure and de facto activity in the CSDP is puzzling in the light of previous literature. Theories of International Relations and European integration usually portray the CSDP as member states’ pursuit of joint gains of some form, and de jure participation is expected to equate de facto participation. But if not for joint gains, then why do EU member states participate in CSDP initiatives? Why does de jure participation not imply active de facto participation? How and why does de facto participation vary? 

Populism and practices of IOs: the case of EU’s Common Foreign and Security Policy | Raffaele Mastrorocco

The recent rise to power of populist parties across the globe brought changes in how states deal within multilateral frameworks, with consequences on practices and norms of international institutions, which experienced different challenges. Although bourgeoning, the literature on populist foreign policy has not studied thoroughly the impact of populist actors on IOs, focussing rather on their policy preferences and practices. On the other hand, institutionalist accounts have pointed at the contesting nature of populism towards global governance but have not explained the consequences of the rise of populism for the practices of IOs. Consequently, the prospectus proposes to look at populist parties in power to understand and explain changes in IOs’ policies. It takes as case study the EU’s CFSP, where intergovernmental bargaining is the norm, and aims at explaining the changes in this policy framework brought about by populist governments in the different Member States. 

On premise places are on a first-come, first serve basis. If you are unable to attend, please cancel your registration to allow others to participate.

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