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Japan, Academic Career Structure

Japan

 

Higher Education in Japan

The Higher Education Bureau of the Ministry of Education is responsible for the basic policies for higher education, the establishment and authorization of universities, junior colleges and colleges of technology, selection of new students and the conferring of degrees, duties related to student welfare guidance, scholarships, and the promotion of student exchanges.

In addition, to promote private education, the Bureau is also responsible for approving the establishment of educational corporations, guidance and assistance on the management of educational corporations, and the provision of assistance toward private school education.

The term of study for universities is four years (six years for medicine, dentistry and veterinary medicine). Graduate schools may also be established within universities, and offer master's courses (two years is the standard term of study) and doctorate courses (five years is the standard term of study, four years for medicine, dentistry and veterinary medicine).

The purpose of junior colleges is to conduct in-depth training and research in specialized academic disciplines and to develop in students the abilities necessary for employment as well as life skills. Terms of study are two to three years and successful graduates are awarded the title of Associate.

The purpose of colleges of technology is to conduct in-depth training in specialized academic disciplines and to develop in students the abilities necessary for employment. Terms of study are five years (five and a half years for mercantile marine studies) and successful graduates are awarded the title of Associate.

 

Career Curriculum

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Requirements for Positions

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Research Career

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Barriers to Career Advancement

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Job Security

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Contracts and Duties

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Sabbatical Opportunities

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Gross Salaries

Gross monthly salary levels from 2007

-StartAverageMax

PhD Candidate

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Postdoc

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--

Assistant Professor

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--

Associate Professor

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Full Professor

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Source:

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Number of Existing Positions

 

 

 

 

 

 

------All Disciplines

PhD Candidate

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Postdoc

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--

--

Assistant Professor

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--

Associate Professor

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Full Professors

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Source:

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Internal Recruitment

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Accessibility for Non-Nationals

Thanks to the law of 1982, which allowed foreign instructors to participate in a faculty assembly of a Japanese university, the number of foreign instructors in four-year colleges and universities has quadrupled since then, from 1,255 to 5,286 in 2002, while the number of faculty members in total has only doubled. The actual percentage of foreign faculty members has increased from 0.97% in 1982 to 3.41% in 2002, which is almost equivalent to the percentage of foreign faculty members in the U.S. (3.36%).

Yet, Japan may still not be an ideal destination for foreign academicians for their career enhancement as subtle discriminations or limitations against foreign faculty members still seem to exist in Japanese institutions in their promotions and the roles they can play in decision-making.

 

National Universities

 

International Universities

By the early 1990s, about 40 American universities had launched off-shore programmes in Japan. However, they did not seek accreditation from the Japanese government because, in order for them to be accredited, they had to go through a cumbersome process of re-establishing themselves as higher education institutions under Japanese law which was designed primarily for domestic universities and colleges. Students enrolled in these branch campuses could not receive the same benefits as those in Japanese universities and were not eligible to apply for admission to the graduate programs of Japanese public universities upon graduation.

As a result, only three out of the 40 foreign branch campuses in Japan that had been established in the 1980s and 1990s have survived and only one of them, Temple University Japan (TUJ), still offers full degree programmes. The other two campuses are Ciao International Village, which offers English language programmes, and University of Maryland University College (UMUC), which is a special campus for Americans on military bases.

In November 2004, under the pressure from the WTO-GATS negotiations, and due to the Prime Minister’s educational reforms, the ministry implemented a new policy to recognize branch campuses of foreign universities, once their home institutions have gained accreditation in their home countries and their statuses are verified by the U.S. embassy. Since then, Japanese universities have started to accept both transfer credits and graduate students from branch campuses of foreign institutions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Academic Unions

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Useful Websites

 

Info for History

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Info for Economics

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Info for Law

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Info for Social and Political Science

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Postdoctoral Information

  

Websites for Job Postings

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Sources

Aoki, K. (2005), 'Japanese Higher Education Institutions in the 21st Century. The Challenge of Globalization and Internationalization', Electronic Journal of Contemporary Japanese Studies, Discussion Paper 7

 

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Page last updated on 21 December 2016